Who am I? 

I had a brilliant night last night at the Ivy Club where I shared a platform with three spectacular women. The topic was an age old debate about whether women can have a successful career and a family. Crazy right. How can we still be having this debate in 2017. 

But it was fascinating to hear the experiences of Viv, Claudette, Julia, and the audience members. The themes that were discussed were on the whole nothing new. 

  • Employers pre-judging pregnant women and mothers and making future career decisions based on their ‘commitment’
  • Lack of flexibility 
  • Being evaluated on presenteeism rather than outcomes and impact
  • Women not being kind to each other and offering a hand up 
  • The stigma of being defined as a ‘mummy’

But despite all this, what was clear was the progress that has been made over the past 40 years. The experience of Claudette, who’s eldest is 44, is incredibly different to mine with a 15 month old. And this should be celebrated. The progress made should be applauded, but there should be no let up in demanding that businesses and society recognise the importance of women in the workplace and the impact working mums can have. 

Julia and Viv both work for themselves.  They’ve opted out of the traditional workplace and made a huge success of their careers and home life. This is increasingly an option more and more women are taking as it allows them to define their working patterns and be masters of their own destiny. 

My own experience has been nothing but positive. Why? Because I work for an incredibly progressive business. Because my husband is a real partner and shares the childcare responsibilities equally. Because I place value on what I achieve and the impact I have. Because I try to always be present when I’m at work, at home, or at play. 

It’s not always easy. But it’s worth it. I love work, I love being a mummy, and I do my best to live every moment of my life. 

As a senior business leader, my commitment is to do whatever I can to ensure that women (and men for that matter) have the tools and the confidence to blend careers and lives. No one in 2017 should have to choose between having a successful career and a fulfilled life.

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The next chapter

All too soon the time has come for me to return to work full time, and goodness I didn’t realise how hard it would be. 

Anyone who knows me, knows that I love work. I have great clients, I enjoy the thrill of going after new business, I love the social interaction and solving challenges as a team, and I’m partial to smashing a target or two. So you would think that I couldn’t wait to get back in the thick of it again? And in once sense I can’t. I’m excited. I’ve got a whole bunch of new ideas that I’ve been thinking about. I’ve got a fresh perspective on what’s important and how to get to where we need to get too. So yes, I’m excited to get back to it, but I’m also incredibly sad. 

I never knew that I would love maternity leave as much as I have. There is not a moment of the past 6 months that I didn’t love. Keir is funny, playful, loving, and just a little bit cheeky. I had no idea such a young baby could have such a big personality. He charms everyone he comes in to contact with, and through the winter months he has been a complete ray of sunshine. If I’m really honest I just don’t want to leave him, and I’ve shed a few tears over the thought of it.


It’s the first time in my life where I’ve wished there was a way to be in two places at once. And to manage it I’ve set myself a few guidelines:

– focus on the things that will have the biggest positive impact both at work and at home 

– know when good is good enough 

– commit to a maximum of 2 evening engagements a week

– be a role-model for flexible working 

– don’t sweat the small stuff 

– spend Friday nights as a family

– ensure every interaction with Keir, no matter how small, is full of love and fun…. and always has a huge hug

I’m sure once I’m in a routine things will start to fall in to place and I’ll find the right blend between work and home. I’ll definitely be seeking tips from other working mums, and there are some great role-models at Ketchum. You don’t have to choose between being a great businesswoman and a great mum – I’m determined to be both and unapologetically simultaneously so, not as two somehow dissonant halves. It’s not going to be easy, but I’m certain it is going to be worth it. 

Wish me luck!