The politics of hate and despair

I was once called a political animal. My blood ran Labour Red. My nickname is RedRobbo. At one point not so long ago I could never have imagined leaving the Labour Party, never mind consider voting for another political party. But if a week in politics is a long time, 10 years can be devastating. 

I joined the Party in 1997 when I started university. Like most of the country, Tony Blair inspired me. He gave me hope. He gave me opportunity. And he made me believe that I, a working class girl from the west of Scotland, could be anything I wanted to be. 

The Labour Party then stood for equality, opportunity, fairness, support for the most vulnerable, celebration of the most successful. It was a Party that wanted to change the country for the better.

When Blair left 10 years ago, I knew things were going to change. I knew Brown would be the next leader, and I knew we would lose the next election. What I hoped was that it would be a wake up call, and that we would choose a candidate that was as progressive as Blair had been in 1995. But no, we choose Ed and the progressives in Labour fell silent. Then we choose Corbyn and it was Armageddon. 

The result of the EU referendum, and the lacklustre destructive role of Corbyn made my membership of the Labour Party untenable and I resigned in June 2016. At that point I hoped to return when a new leader and new progressive agenda was developed. But I now believe that will never happen. 

The decision last night regarding Ken Livingstone’s anti-semetic views and conduct is the most disgraceful thing I have seen in recent years. The Labour Party has become a political vehicle that is no longer a safe space or living the values that I believe progressive politics are about. 

Worse it sends a message to Jewish families like mine, right from the core structures of the party that hatred of Jews and Holocaust revisionism are a mild inconvenience. I don’t need to quote anyone to know how putting a party like that in government might end.

The Labour Party has become representative of the politics of hate and despair. Corbyn and his cronies should be deeply ashamed. But they are not.

http://m.huffpost.com/uk/entry/uk_58e4b71fe4b0d0b7e1663303

There are still some great MPs in the Parliamentary Labour Party. Some great councillors across the country. Some great members knocking on doors. But they are now the minority. The British people don’t want to hear from Labour any more. The ship is sinking fast and for those that believe in progressive politics it is time to abandon ship. It is time to offer the British people something new. Something exciting. It is time to offer us a glimmer of hope. 

2016 was simply the best

I’m sure a few people had a double-take when they read my blog title. There is so much despair and hatred towards what’s gone on in 2016 that I don’t blame you. From Britain leaving the EU, to Trump, and the horrors of Syria, 2016 hasn’t been  the world’s finest moment. 

But for me personally, 2016 has been the best year of my life. In the first 6 months I found my stride as Deputy CEO of Ketchum, learning new skills and embracing different styles. I got to know so many more people that I work with as people and discovered passions and talents that I simply didn’t know we had. My new role has given me a fresh passion for the communication industry, and also a firm belief that Ketchum has the ingredients to be the best, most innovative, and most sought after agency in the world. I’ve still got a lot to learn, and our agency still has much to do, but it’s an exciting time and we will make the most of it. 

The second half of the year has taken my breath away. My little baby Keir made a dramatic entrance following 43 hours of Labour on the 14th of July at 0218. He is spectacular in every way. I did not know that I could love another human so deeply and so unconditionally. I did not know how things that had been such a priority and had huge significance in my life would become secondary to this tiny human that I am responsible for. I’ve found absolute joy in every second that I have spent with him in 2016 and he has made me refocus my time and energy. I’ve managed to keep close to work without it encroaching on this special time. I’ve always believed in fairness, equality, meritocracy, work hard/play hard, fun, adventure, success, laughter, friends, family.  Not one of these has changed. In fact they have become deeper beliefs. I’m committed, more than ever, to doing small things that can have a big impact to try and make the world a better place. For Keir, and for all of us. 

So whilst right wing thinking seems to be on the march all over the world and progressive ideas are having to work 100 times harder to be heard, I’m not disillusioned, I’m determined. Those of us in the centre (left and right) must come together to fight extremism in all its form, to promote tolerance and acceptance, and to make arguments about ideas that the masses can believe in and get behind. 

So if you have a project or a nugget of an idea, I’d love to help you. Probably in a small way, but every little helps – right?

2016 has been my best yet. But I know for many of my friends it has been a long hard slog. So whilst I will say goodbye and cheers tonight, I know not everyone will. Let’s hope that 2017 can be a year to remember for everyone for the right reasons. It won’t happen by magic, we all need to work at it. As my mum always said to me when I was growing up ‘you get back whatever you put in’, so let’s put in all we’ve got and see the amazing results that will bring. 

Happy new year. Health and happiness to each and every one of you. 

My love is like a red red rose

My son is the love of my life. I’m not at all embarrassed to say that. He lights up my every moment. He makes me want to be better, to succeed, to change the world to make it a better place for him. 

That’s why I can’t support the Labour Party any more. I simply don’t believe that having Jeremy Corbyn as Prime Minister, or Labour running our country, could in any way be good for my wee boy’s future. 

Why? Because they want to take our country back to the 70s, not forward to 2017, 2018, or indeed 2025. They don’t believe in wealth creation. They don’t believe in enabling and celebrating individual or collective success. They are anti business and anti globalisation. They are anti-interventionism, and have dodgy ‘friends’ in some of the world’s worst organisations. John McDonnell is a bully. Diane Abbott is at best stupid. And Corbyn is a puppet for the hard left, most recently speaking at an SWP event!

I used to say I couldn’t vote anything but Labour. That my blood was red for a reason. That I loved the Labour Party like I loved my family. But as I’ve grown up. As I’ve become a boss and a mother, I’ve realised that choosing the person to be Prime Minister and the Party to run the country is a big responsibility. It can’t come down to blind loyalty. It has to be about the political vision, the personal leadership, that is on offer. It has to be about who is offering job security and educational opportunity. Who is balancing economic growth with a strong welfare state. Who do I believe, when our country is in danger, will protect us and the rest of the world. Corbyn and the Labour Party he is leading is not the answer to any of the things outlined above. 

So the obvious question is who will I vote for? And the honest answer is that right now I just don’t know. Locally, in Haringey, I will vote Labour. We have a strong sensible Labour Council that is investing in our community. But at the General Election I will have to actually read the manifestos, listen to the speeches, and for the first time in my adult life I will be one of those fought over floating voters. Unless, of course, Labour finds its purpose (and a new leader) before then. But I won’t hold my breath.